Wednesday, 24 July 2013

Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function Biogarphy

Source(google.com.pk)
In the 1990's so much is being written about Arab women and Islamic women. Despite this, many Americans have the idea that all Arab women wear veils all the time. There is such a wide range in patterns and cultures in the Arab League countries, it would be a disservice to all to proclaim that there is a normal mode of dress or lifestyle for women—or for men—in the Arab countries.
In Tunisia alone, for example, women show a wide range of dress and lifestyles. Many women work in areas ranging from weaving rugs to highly professional work in social services and business. Tunisia Digest, the newsletter published by the Tunisian information office in Washington, D.C., offers no suggestions on dress for either men or women, but tradition in the country strongly suggests that women not wear shorts or skirts above the knee. It is considered in poor taste to do so. For a foreigner to do so is insulting to the people. At the same time, one rarely sees a woman with her face covered at all, though many wear a shawl-like article covering over the hair and dress.
In contrast, the Saudi Arabia, a monthly newsletter of the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia, says “Western women are not required to wear the traditional full-length abaya, or cloak over their clothing, but they are encouraged to wear a knee-length tunic/dress over slacks and a scarf on their heads.” The assumption is that Saudi women are encouraged to wear the full cloak over their clothing.
In like manner, involving oneself in Islam varies considerably for women within the Arab countries.
For instance, in the current issue (#191) of the Middle East Report, Heba Ra'uf Ezzat of Cairo, Egypt explains that she is “not an Islamic feminist. I do believe in Islam as a world view, and I think that women’s liberation in our society should rely on Islam.”
Ezzat is an assistant in the Political Science Department at Cairo University and believes that “God (does not) want to humiliate me as a woman.” At the same time, many women accept Islam as they have always known it while others do not make room for religion in their lives at all, and some make room for other religions.
Too many Americans have the Casablanca image of camels and veiled women etc. as their only view of the Arab people. The Habiba Chaouch Foundation continues to bring bits and pieces of the reality to Americans through this newsletter, speaking to community groups and the outreach projects which aim to diminish the myth of what the people are like. A list of reading about Arab women and women of Islam is available from the Foundation office.
Banners, flags and multicolored lights are everywhere. If it sounds like Christmas in the United States, guess again. These are the outward displays of a culture celebrating Aid Al Fitr, the holiday which comes at the conclusion of the Holy Month of Ramadan.
Fasting from sunup to sundown during the month of Ramadan is one of the five main pillars of Islam. Fasting means no food or drink (even water) or smoking during these hours. The other "pillars" of Islam are to believe Allah is the only God and Mohammed is his prophet; to pray five times each day; to give to charity and, if possible, to pilgrimage to the Holy City of Mecca (in Saudi Arabia).
During Ramadan more than a billion Muslims worldwide usually work slightly shorter days and celebrate the breaking of the fast with a family dinner at sundown. Ramadan is either 29 or 30 days long, and is based on the lunar calendar, which means that over a period of many years, the holiday occurs in different "months." Ramadan begins 11 days earlier each year on our calendar.
During Aid Al Fitr there is an additional prayer during the day. Ramadan is intended for people to experience the life of the unfortunate among the world's population that frequently have only a single meal during the day. Most Muslims contribute more to worthy causes during this holy month, and several sites for the poor to get a warm meal are staffed with volunteers.
In the evenings, people stay up late for family and other gatherings. Multiple cultural and artistic events are scheduled. Many young people gather at caf├ęs in celebration of the breaking of the fast.
Arabic mehndi for Function
Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function

Arabic mehndi for Function


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